Shakespeare s twelfth night patterns of love

Rather than resolving anything, the last line of the passage continues the ambiguity found throughout. Antonio is in a more difficult situation, as social norms do not allow for the gratification of his apparently sexual attraction to Sebastian.

Although probably not intended to the extent of a lesbian courtship, the situation of a woman wooing another woman presents a comical picture for the audience, perhaps even more so in the Elizabethan era with two male actors wooing each other as women.

By swearing on "everything" Olivia devalues the things that she swore upon before and suddenly seems rather supercilious. Such messages are used both for purposes of communication and miscommunication—sometimes deliberate and sometimes accidental.

Read in this manner, the passage becomes a satirical enactment of a traditional courtship. This role reversal is not hidden since Olivia plainly says "I woo" as she addresses Cesario.

Yet without Sebastian, without the true male, chaos reigns and reason breaks down. We can thus only wonder whether Orsino is truly in love with Viola, or if he is more enamoured of her male persona.

At the end of the play, as the happy lovers rejoice, both Malvolio and Antonio are prevented from having the objects of their desire. The line might be read as the concluding lesson to a sarcastic representation of courtship; to follow the conventions is good, but to have love returned is much better.

One could read that it is better to love a member of the same sex and not have the love returned than to be hounded by suitors.

Even once everything is revealed, Orsino continues to address Viola by her male name. This would support the interpretation that she is not in her proper role, and will be happier if she returns to the traditional state of passivity.

For Feste, the disguise completes his assumption of a new identity—in order to be Sir Topas, he must look like Sir Topas. Individuals can be employed in the place of written communication—Orsino repeatedly sends Cesario, for instance, to deliver messages to Olivia.

When Olivia declares that not even "wit nor reason" can hide her passion, she suggests that she would love Cesario even if it were against logic, as a same sex couple would be. Then she urges Cesario not to take his "reasons from this clause"presumably indicating he should not base his decisions on her revealed passion, but should instead "reason thus with reason fetter" Even with all the problems supposedly solved, the gender role question is still present for Olivia seems never to have entirely relinquished her active "male" role.

But letters are not the only kind of messages that characters employ to communicate with one another. Objects can function as messages between people as well: The comparison of love to guilt tempts the readers mind to wonder if Olivia is guilty about her love for such female attributes.

Despite the fact that the play offers a happy ending, in which the various lovers find one another and achieve wedded bliss, Shakespeare shows that love can cause pain.

The gender switch serves to emphasize the impossibility of love within a structure which demands that the object of desire must refuse in order to remain desirable.Struggling with themes such as Love in William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, or What You Will?

We've got the quick and easy lowdown on it here. Love and Gender in Twelfth Night Shakespeare's Twelfth Night examines patterns of love and courtship through a twisting of gender roles. In Act 3, scene 1, Olivia displays the confusion created for both characters and audience as she takes on the traditionally male role of wooer in an attempt to win the disguised Viola, or Cesario.

After reading James C Bulman’s article over the Globe’s more recent performance of Twelfth Night and Shakespeare’s original written version, I realized that there are many ways that this famous piece has been portrayed and each has its own pros and cons.

Shakespeare's Twelfth Night examines patterns of love and courtship through a. Twelfth Night is a romantic comedy, and romantic love is the play’s main focus.

Despite the fact that the play offers a happy ending, in which the various lovers find one another and achieve wedded bliss, Shakespeare shows that love can cause pain.

Many characters in Twelfth Night assume disguises, beginning with Viola, who puts on male attire and makes everyone else believe that she is a man. By dressing his protagonist in male garments, Shakespeare creates endless sexual confusion with the Olivia-Viola--Orsino love triangle.

Twelfth Night: Theme of Love In the play "Twelfth Night," Shakespeare explores and illustrates the emotion of love with precise detail. According to "Webster's New World Dictionary," love is defined as "a strong affection or liking for someone.".

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Shakespeare s twelfth night patterns of love
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