Grendel a nihilist or existentialist

An animal, however, has a center of dominant activity—the head—and if that center is severed from the rest of the animal, the entire coordination collapses. He grants that Grendel does have a kind of purpose in life: In reality, of course, the Shaper has no broader vision than any other man, and he is still working within the same limited system of facts and observations.

Before the "dawn of science" and the Age Of Reason, it was universally accepted that there were such things as gods, right and wrong, and heroism. The Shaper, through the power of his imaginative art, provides the Danes with an illusion that their systems are real.

The dragon ascertains that Grendel has come seeking answers about the Shaper, and he begins by explaining the flaws in human thinking. However, with the developing interest in science and the mechanization of the universe near the end of the Renaissance, the need for a God was essentially removed, and humankind was left to reconsider the origin of meaning.

Existentialism In Grendel The debate between existentialism and the rest of the world is a fierce, albeit recent one. John Gardners intelligently written Grendel is a commentary on the merits and flaws of both types of worldview: As a more highly evolved creature than Grendel and the humans, the dragon has a vision of the world that is beyond anything these low creatures can comprehend.

Grendel and the dragon reach a frustrated impasse.

Existentialism In Grendel

Nihilism takes existentialism a step further, to an even bleaker worldview. If a vegetable is split into many different pieces, nothing changes from piece to piece; its organization of molecules remains consistent throughout its body. He illustrates his point by comparing a vegetable to an animal.

The novel follows the life of a character who is gradually "disillusioned," turning from a teary romantic into a cold nihilist.

To the dragon, the values of piety, charity, nobility, and altruism are totally interchangeable irrelevancies. Like existentialists, nihilists deny the existence of any inherent meaning or value in the world.

The dragon makes the same comparison between a rock and a human. And so I discovered the sunken door, and so I came up, for the first time, to moon light, recalls Grendel, remembering his first days out on earth as he analyzed and discovered various creatures and his surroundings with blatant ignorance The dragon also explains to Grendel how all nature inevitably moves toward more complex forms of organization.

Whether Grendel sticks with man, helps the poor, or feeds the hungry is irrelevant in the long run. Reading his mind, the dragon scoffs at the idea, asking him brusquely: After having thoroughly read the book, there is no doubt that Grendel shows proof of support in existentialism.

Even the dragon himself will be killed someday. Lacking the total vision that the dragon has, humans approximate by gluing isolated facts together and trying to link them into logical chains and rational systems.

As a record of historical acts of bravery, the entire purpose of Beowulf is to ensure the fame of its hero and the culture of warriors he represents.The antagonist Grendel travels on a journey of self-discovery, eventually becoming a nihilist, only to be gallantly disproved by the hero Beowulf.

In the end Gardner proves that the virtues of individuality and meaning triumph over meaningless violence and destruction. Nihilism and Existentialism in Grendel Nihilism, as well as existentialism and a host of other philosophies are boldly explored in Grendel, a novel by John Gardner.

The antagonist Grendel travels on a journey of self-discovery, eventually becoming a nihilist, only to be gallantly disproved by the hero Beowulf. In philosophical terms, Grendel’s visit with the dragon pushes Grendel’s inherent existentialism to the more extreme philosophy of nihilism.

Existentialism is a school of thought that presupposes the absence of God and a total lack of meaning in life. The dragon gives Grendel a true piece of Nihilist advice in this quote. He tells Grendel to basically forget everything, and ignore the humans that are bothering him, and do the one thing that he know is real, which is sit on a pile of gold for the rest of his life.

Nihilism, as well as existentialism and a host of other philosophies are boldly explored in Grendel, a novel by John Gardner. The antagonist Grendel travels on a journey of self-discovery, eventually becoming a nihilist, only to be gallantly disproved by the hero Beowulf.

Additionally, Gardner portrays continual analysis, and final approval, of existentialist viewpoints as one observes that the main character, Grendel, is an mi-centre.com having thoroughly read the book, there is no doubt that Grendel shows proof of support in existentialism.

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Grendel a nihilist or existentialist
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